Contexts

sociology for the public

Spring 2019

Volume: 18 | Number: 2

The future will need people who understand that migration is normal, not criminal. To get there, we will need vision and heart, but also knowledge. In this issue, some of the nation’s leading scholars explain how dysfunctional and cruel our current migration system is and propose ways to get to a much better place.

Stemming the Exploitation of Immigrant Farm Labor

Andrew R. Smolski on leveraging labor and immigration policy to protect H-2A farm workers and provide a path to citizenship. Read More

Health and Romantic Union Dissolution

Poor health is associated with an increased likelihood of romantic union dissolution. But it is still questionable whether this association is gendered and whether married … Read More

Color-Blindness Wrapped With a White Bow

J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy, a memoir of a poor, White, Appalachian upbringing, focused on a social location and identity that are particularly pressing under the … Read More

Binding Neighborhoods Through Co-Offending Networks

What explains the unequal distribution of crime across city neighborhoods? Labels are often designated to high-crime neighborhoods and the people who call them home. Countering … Read More

Risk and Resilience on Reservations

American Indian reservations are the result of a brutal history of genocide and forced displacement of Native people by the United States government. Today, American … Read More

When a School Isn’t Just a School

Nadirah Farah Foley on Ghosts in the Schoolyard. Read More

Intellectual Integrity and the Relevance of Sociology to Public Policy

Margarita Mooney interviews Robert P. George. Read More

Black Artists and Elite Taste Culture

Patricia A. Banks on the uneven unfolding of racial and gender diversity in elite art markets. Read More

Yes, Sociology Is Racist, Too

There is no doubt that elitism and power structures exist within the field of sociology. In their 2018 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity article, … Read More

Afrofuturism and Black Panther

Myron T. Strong and K. Sean Chaplin on the liberatory potential of Afrofuturism. Read More